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Posts Tagged ‘History’

Well, the election is over and of course, many of us on the right are wondering what the heck happened.

Everything pointed to Romney winning in a landslide.  Everything was wrong.

On November 7, many of us woke up feeling like we had been hit by a Mack truck.  And, then, of course, the “experts” all had their theories on what happened. There were several ideas offered.  Then, there were the apologists who said we had to compromise our stance on several issues.

I spent a great deal of time trying to understand what happened.  After all, what good does it do us if we don’t learn something from our experiences?  I turned off commentators and the news channels.  I wanted to really think about it on my own.  And a few days after the election, I had an epiphany.

The question kept haunting me, everything I know about history, everything, pointed to a decisive Romney victory, so why did he loose?  All I’ve ever learned about US history told me that he should have won.  History shows us patterns and for some reason, this election didn’t fall into that pattern.  Why?  Why did this election fail the history I’ve come to trust?

Then it hit me.  Hard.  Very hard.

The reason I didn’t understand what happened, the reason why the “experts” didn’t understand what happened, is because we were all looking at US history.  The answer to this election is not to be found in US history.  You’ve got to look at European history.  That’s where we will find our answers.  That’s the history we have to look at.

See, the way I see it, we figured the people in this country would care about the same things they’ve always cared about, hence, look at US History to see how it would turn out.  But, we didn’t realize that what people were looking for changed.  It wasn’t about freedom and liberty anymore.  It wasn’t about keeping the US strong and a superpower.  It wasn’t about preserving capitalism.  No, instead, this election was about “me.”  No, not me, but the “me” attitude.  It was about entitlements and what people thought would improve their individual situation.  People showed they cared more about themselves than their country.

Sadly, the people of this country chose to worry only about themselves, and not about the country as a whole.  And, as I thought about it more and more, I realized our country was no longer the country I thought I knew.  But, instead, it was more like Europe.  We are making many of the same choices now that many of the people in Europe did generations ago.  That’s not being a sore looser, that’s just looking at facts.  Our country now mirrors European history much more than it does US history.

Then, I realized something else:  I need to learn more about European history!

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Last week we celebrated the 43rd anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Being a person that loves history and space, I’ve always felt drawn to this particular era in space exploration. There is something about it that is majestic and noble. I’m not quite sure what it is, but I do know this. I love how we were never deterred, even when things were beyond difficult. I love how we weren’t afraid to reach for really big things. I love how we turned grandiose ideas into actual realities. I love that we weren’t just impartial observers of the heavens from the ground, but that we actually became part of this new frontier.

I wanted to share with you, especially in light of recent comments by political leaders, my thoughts on the first moon landing, and what it means to me.

In May of 1961, President John F. Kennedy delivered an address to Congress that forever changed the nation – and the world.

Smack in the middle of the Cold War, President Kennedy challenged America, and America answered the call.

First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth. No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish.

What a challenge! Some thought he was crazy. Developing a manned space program to travel to, and return from, the moon in less than 9 years? This wasn’t a science fiction movie. How could that even be accomplished? 9 years! He knew it would be difficult, but he wanted this done in 9 years!

NASA easily could have backed out and said that it just wasn’t enough time. The public would understand that. But, they didn’t. And the American public proudly stood behind NASA and the space program. The astronauts were heroes- idolized by the public. People looked at President Kennedy and NASA as great patriots. Everyone was excited by the possibility of actually landing a man on the moon – and not just any man, but an American.

It obviously wouldn’t be easy. 9 years is not much time when you are talking about traveling almost 239,000 miles away, and coming back home. 9 years. It would require tremendous effort, but we weren’t afraid of the challenge. In fact, we welcomed it.

19 months after his address to Congress, President Kennedy again addressed the nation, this time from Rice University. The whole speech is really amazing, but one part in particular stood out to me.

We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.

We do it because it is hard. Did you catch that? Because it is hard. Wow. This is profound to me. We aren’t taking the easy road here. We want to be the leader in space exploration. We want the American flag to wave on the moon. Of course this won’t be easy, but we are Americans and we do things because they are hard and challenging. We are up to the challenge and we will lead the entire free world in our quest for knowledge of the worlds beyond our own.

We are America.

Talk about American exceptionalism. Holy cow!

Sadly, President Kennedy didn’t live to see it, but his challenge was answered.

On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 reached the moon, and Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin were the first people to land on the moon. It was an absolutely amazing!

What an amazing feat! What a grand accomplishment! Never before, in the entire history of mankind, had man set foot on the moon. And there we were. Our flag flew on the moon.

America rejoiced. America celebrated. America took pride in this amazing accomplishment. We knew this would open doors we never dreamed possible. We knew what this meant, not only for America, but for humanity. This was something simply astonishing.

In thinking about this, I had to ask myself if we could accomplish this today. I honestly don’t know, which makes me feel sad. Heartbroken and mournful for the country I love and for what once was.

A once hard working America, that wasn’t afraid to dream big, has turned lackadaisical. An America that once valued hard work and study, is now caught deeply in the entitlement trap. An America that once rewarded and praised success, now villainizes it at every possible chance. And America that once was self sufficient now expects others to save us. An America that once embraced creativity and innovation, now discourages and wants conformity. An America that once stood tall and proud, is now far too apologetic.

I just don’t know if we could do it now.

But once, we did. Once we stood together in a moment of absolute greatness, and we were one. One in pride. One in accomplishment. One in spirit. One nation. One people. United in splendor.

In that moment, we dreamed. We dreamed lofty and grandiose ideas, and we celebrated those dreams. For we knew we could accomplish anything.

We were America.

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Answers

I know I’m pretty late getting these up, but things have been really busy.

Anyway, here are the answers to the history quiz.  Do you need to take a history class?  (Answers are in bold.)

Q1. When was the Civil War?

a. 1750-1800

b. 1800-1850

c. 1850-1900

d. 1900-1950

e. after 1950

Q2. Who said “Give me liberty or give me death?”

a. John Hancock

b. James Madison

c. Patrick Henry

d. Samuel Adams

(more…)

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What’s Your History IQ?

The following is taken from a letter I received from Hillsdale College

In April of 2004, the American Council of Tustees and Alumni (ACTA) released the results of a 50-college study in a booklet titled “The Hollow Core.”  The purpose of the study was to determine if America’s colleges and universities were meeting their obligation to provide today’s students with a core group of courses “that ensure a solid general education.”  The study showed less than desirable results, concluding the “America’s colleges are, in truth, offering little more than a ‘hollow core.'”  (more…)

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In light of the terrible attack on Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan, I feel compelled to express my views on Al-Qaeda. The following is a paper I wrote for a class I took called Terrorism and Political Violence. I think it is important to understand these people, or we will never be able to defeat them. 

A Backwards Looking People and an Infidel Nation

On September 11, 2001, the United States incurred the worst terrorist attack in its history when two hijacked airplanes crashed into the World Trade Towers in New York. Another hijacked airplane crashed into the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., while yet another one bound for the Capital crashed in a field in Pennsylvania. This attack hit the heart of America. Many of us cried and reeled as we watched the Trade Towers collapse right before our eyes, and thought of all the people inside of them. Thousands of people died that day, and bodies were found for weeks to come. This horrific act left many Americans asking who was behind it. Who would commit these terrible attacks? In the days that followed, we learned that a radical Islamic terrorist group named Al-Qaeda was responsible. Many Americans had never heard of this group, but it would soon become a household name and we would learn much more about them and their leader Osama bin Laden. (more…)

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A lot has been happening the last week or so. First of all, to address my last post: that horrible immigration bill was defeated! (At least for now.) Hooray!! I’m so glad. Now we shouldn’t see a revisit of that until 2008, so we’ve got a little bit of time anyway.
Next, on Monday night, our sweet little baby puppy died. He just stopped breathing. Adam tried CPR and mouth to mouth to get him breathing again, but it just wasn’t meant to be. We buried him in the backyard Tuesday morning. We were all upset about it, but I think I took it the hardest. I’m feeling better now, but I really miss him.
Here he is with Adam, just 2 days old.

Ok, what else? Saturday, we started laying the new flooring in our house. I’m so excited about it! It looks great! I am so very grateful to our wonderful friends who came to help us! It took 7 hours on Saturday just to do the one room. I’ll have to find some way to repay them all! Then, Tuesday, my dad and Adam got another room done, which took about 4 hours. So now, I think we are about half way done. Oh, I will be so excited when it’s all done.
So, yesterday was Independence Day. I love this holiday! It’s so wonderful to celebrate our nation and the freedoms we all enjoy. I think we often take for granted what we have been so blessed with. There is no better country on the face of this earth. There is no other country where the people are free in thought, religion, work, school, where they live, everything. It is amazing. I know that the Lord had a hand in establishing this nation, and that the founding fathers were truly inspired by Him. It is remarkable to be here, and I wish more people would realize that.

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Today is the 63rd anniversary of D-Day. On June 6, 1944, we were fighting against an evil enemy, bent on destroying everything we hold dear. As I was listening to Boortz this morning, he played the speech that President Roosevelt made that day. It was actually a prayer. (Yes, the Pres. actually said a prayer over the radio.) Anyway, while I was listening to this, I realized that this same exact prayer could be given today. Everything, except the location, applies to our troops and country today. Isn’t it amazing? People need to realize that this wonderful freedom we have has come at a great cost. I don’t think we can ever stop fighting for the cause of freedom.

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